Local Data

Location & Expansion Log

Diverse companies – from startups to multinational corporations – continue to relocate and expand existing operations in the Charleston region.

CRDA-Facilitated Projects

View All

Sundaram-Clayton Limited (SCL)

February 9, 2017

Jobs: 130
Cap. Investment: $50 Million

Aluminum high-pressure die-cast products and permanent mold gravity cast parts for automotive OEMs

SCL, a leading Indian-based manufacturer of aluminum cast products for global automotive OEMs, has chosen Dorchester County in the Charleston SC Metro Area for its first U.S. plant. Company officials report they chose the Ridgeville Industrial Campus site for "certain strategic business advantages, including proximity to a high-quality port; a well-rounded transportation network; a young, well-educated, diverse workforce; and an excellent business environment." Their $50 million capital investment is expected to create 130 new jobs in the region, as site construction begins by April 2017 and full plant operations start by late 2018.

Evonik

December 13, 2016

Jobs: 55
Cap. Investment: $120 Million

Precipitated silica for use in tire production

One of the world's largest specialty chemical companies, Evonik employs more than 33,500 people in more than 100 countries. The German firm will build a precipitated silica plant in the Charleston International Manufacturing Center at 1588 Bushy Park Road near Goose Creek, S.C., to supply the tire industry. A leader in tire production, South Carolina is also the United States' top exporter of tires. Completion of the new plant is expected by mid-2018.

View All

New & Expanding

View All

Sundaram-Clayton Limited (SCL)

February 9, 2017

Jobs: 130
Cap. Investment: $50 Million

Aluminum high-pressure die-cast products and permanent mold gravity cast parts for automotive OEMs

SCL, a leading Indian-based manufacturer of aluminum cast products for global automotive OEMs, has chosen Dorchester County in the Charleston SC Metro Area for its first U.S. plant. Company officials report they chose the Ridgeville Industrial Campus site for "certain strategic business advantages, including proximity to a high-quality port; a well-rounded transportation network; a young, well-educated, diverse workforce; and an excellent business environment." Their $50 million capital investment is expected to create 130 new jobs in the region, as site construction begins by April 2017 and full plant operations start by late 2018.

KION North America Corp.

February 6, 2017

Jobs: 50
Cap. Investment: $5.7 Million

Assembly of forklifts and pallet jacks; material handling equipment parts distribution; North American headquarters

KION North America announces that it will invest $5.7 million to expand its Dorchester County operations to meet increased demand from customers in Canada, Mexico and the U.S.-- including Volvo Car Corp., whose first U.S. auto assembly plant is under construction in nearby Berkeley County. KION is expected to add another 50 jobs to its local base over the next five years, quadrupling production capacity at its Summerville plant to 12,000 vehicles a year by 2020.

View All

Downsizing

View All

Amazon

November 29, 2016

Book-printing fulfillment center

Amazon is closing a book-making facility in North Charleston in 2017, affecting 149 jobs. The Investment Drive site operations, which prints and ships books, will consolidate into the company's Columbia SC Metro Area distribution hub.

Impresa Aerospace

November 4, 2016

Manufacture metal parts for commercial aircraft

Closure by the end of 2016, affecting 20 jobs. The news of Impresa's local plant closing comes just weeks after the company announced the lay off 39 workers at its Wichita, Kan., location. The Wichita plant will continue to operate, as well as the Los Angeles, CA, area headquarters. The Goose Creek SC plant has only been open since 2015, and company officials say that in hindsight, maybe the expansion to South Carolina was premature. "We came to the conclusion that it wasn’t profitable for us to maintain that facility," CEO Scott Smith said. "It was a bit of a timing problem," he said. "We were too early. There wasn't enough tangible utilization of our resources in the near term" to survive.

View All

Back To The Top